Tag Archives: privacy

Facebook is tracking your online activities at all times even when you log out.

Facebook is tracking your online activities at all times even when you log out.

podcaster:

The most ridiculous brand of human being, in my opinion, is the one who responds to online privacy concerns with “Everything on Facebook is public. I don’t have anything to hide.” I’m interested in what these people say when they realize that Facebook automatically sends certain purchases to your profile without your permission, and that its cookies track and record every Web site you visit on your browser even when you’re logged out of Facebook. But hey, it’s all public, right?

That’s it. Game over. Just deleted my Facebook account.

Check this out – Yes Facebook tracks you even when you’ve logged out ? nikcub-static.appspot.com/logging-out-of-facebook-is-not-enough

youngmanhattanite:

moorehn:

Seriously?

Well, this doesn’t surprise me too much.  After all, every one of us should be aware that we’re not Facebook’s customers. Facebook’s customers are advertisers.  We are Soylent Green fed to the advertisers—aka, what advertisers pay Facebook for is made of people. Our eyes, our traffic, our behavior patterns.  This is how big brother really works.  It follows you where ever you go and knows whatever you do. If you don’t mind having your every move tracked and exploited by Facebook, they’ll be happy to provide you with a place to connect with friends and family and a place to post links, pictures and video that you can share with said friends and family.

I hate to sound jaded, but I don’t know if Facebook being all KGB on us is that big of a deal.  I mean, so what? We’re being exploited.  So?  I mean, it’s lame we don’t get a bigger piece of Zuckerdouche’s financial pie (we just get the services Facebook offers), but in the end, what are we losing?  

I’m not saying we’re not losing anything, it’s just that I’m honestly not sure what it is.

More on the Morons at TSA and our Government re: full-body scanning and pat-downs/feel-ups.

After I posted about a woman who had both labia touched during a so-called “pat-down” by a TSA operative, I saw a post on lifehacker.com that went into more depth (and included the above pic—I love how the blond TSA guy looks a little flush at the prospect of doing a cavity search on that boy). Anyway, so it’s an interesting post (read it) and it directly addresses whether or not you can refuse to be security-checked:

Can You Refuse These New Measures?

The short answer is no. Once you get to security there’s no turning back. You’re in for some serious consequences if you refuse to participate:

[A]nyone who refuses to complete the screening process will be denied access to airport secure areas and could be subject to civil penalties, the administration said, citing a federal appeals court ruling in support of the rule. The ruling, from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, says that “requiring that a potential passenger be allowed to revoke consent to an ongoing airport security search makes little sense in a post-9/11 world. Such a rule would afford terrorists multiple opportunities to attempt to penetrate airport security by ‘electing not to fly’ on the cusp of detection until a vulnerable portal is found.

What to Do?

You can opt to sign the We Won’t Fly petition, try methods suggested on Shut Down the Airports, or support organizations like Flyer’s Rights if you feel these new security measures are too invasive and should be removed. On the other hand, if you travel infrequently these measures may not be that big of a deal.

GOTTA LOVE BIG GOVERNMENT!

Do you actually agree with these new TSA rules? Well, if so, ask yourself this:

What are the odds of you or anyone you know actually being killed by a terrorist?

The answer is zero. It doesn’t happen enough to really be able to work out the numbers. Statistically, Americans are never killed by terrorists while flying over American soil. There was ONE TIME when it happened.

What’s really sad is that the terrorists have won.

We don’t live in a free country anymore. If we did I wouldn’t have to have my nads fiddled with just to prove I’m not Osama bin ThePete.

Good to know: Major Corporations Are Downloading Those 100 Million Facebook Profiles off BitTorrent

thedaytheytriedtokillme:

Major Corporations Are Downloading Those 100 Million Facebook Profiles off BitTorrent

Who’s surprised? HANDS UP!

Read one reason this is bad. Another reason is this: why must corporations work so hard to make EVERY THIN DIME THEY CAN??

Yes, yes, I know “because they’re greedy” but that’s not a reason. That’s an excuse to be shitty.

Why Facebook and other socnets should be 100% secure (even with stuff you make public)

“100 Million Facebook Users Data Collated into One Giant-Ass File” from thetechpete:

The harvest has begun.. Ron Bowes is from Canada, and he is a security consultant. Just this week, Mr. Bowes changed the world as we know it, perhaps ever damning the word “privacy” into the trash heap of history. And how did he do it? Using the very data that people knowingly and happily gave up themselves on Facebook..

Bowes collated 100 million Facebook users’ names, addresses, and unique ID numberson a single 2.8 gig file and posted it online..Facebook also enabled this grand release of private data.

via coalspeaker.com

I would quit Facebook in a New York second if only I could convince my family and friends who treat the site like a religion to quit, too.

Maybe I should bite the bullet and set the good example.  The problem with that is simple: FB as lame as it is, is great for networking.  Plus, it saves me money on business cards—I barely give them out. I just tell them the socnets I’m on and they find me if they want to.

I just wish Zuckerberg wasn’t such a douche with our stuff.

See, I get that I make my info public. 

What I don’t like is how Facebook and other socnets make it so easy for other things to be done with my info. 

I don’t know if it there needs to be a law against it or if Facebook and other socnets should be forced to give us the ability to not just block all info from being public but to also prohibit the info from being copyable by anyone.  I put my content out there for people to view it where I want them to—I don’t like the idea of my content being in some massive list or on some other site that doesn’t share revenue with me.  This may be a brave new world, but I’ve got bills to pay, just like everyone else.  Let me control my shit—the least you can do is pay me for it when you use it.

100 Million Facebook Users Data Collated into One Giant-Ass File

The harvest has begun.. Ron Bowes is from Canada, and he is a security consultant. Just this week, Mr. Bowes changed the world as we know it, perhaps ever damning the word “privacy” into the trash heap of history. And how did he do it? Using the very data that people knowingly and happily gave up themselves on Facebook..

Bowes collated 100 million Facebook users’ names, addresses, and unique ID numberson a single 2.8 gig file and posted it online..Facebook also enabled this grand release of private data.

via coalspeaker.com

I would quit Facebook in a New York second if only I could convince my family and friends who treat the site like a religion to quit, too.

Maybe I should bite the bullet and set the good example.  The problem with that is simple: FB as lame as it is, is great for networking.  Plus, it saves me money on business cards—I barely give them out. I just tell them the socnets I’m on and they find me if they want to.

I just wish Zuckerberg wasn’t such a douche with our stuff.

“Zuckerberg needs your data…”

“Zuckerberg needs your data. His business is built upon it. The most important thing to understand about Facebook is that you are not Facebook’s customer, you are its inventory. You are the product Facebook is selling. Facebook’s real customers are advertisers. You, as a Facebook member, are useful only because you can be packaged up and sold to advertisers. The more information Facebook can get from you, the more you are worth. In response, a FB spokesman told me: “I’m sorry you feel that way.”

Lyons, on Facebook (via newsweek)

But isn’t this the same with any ad-supported service? MySpace? GMail? Etc?  Hell, even advertising on the old TV is built this way. It’s our behavior that is the product.

All that said, I wonder if most people understand this dynamic.  No one is getting “free hosting services” for their pics and status updates—they are getting hosting services in exchange for their pics and status updates.  Maybe not the literal content, but the behavior patterns behind the content is sold to advertisers.  How else are these sites supposed to remain “free”?

Zuckerberg’s Law of Information Sharing

Link: Zuckerberg’s Law of Information Sharing

newsweek:

soupsoup:

“I would expect that next year, people will share twice as much information as they share this year, and next year, they will be sharing twice as much as they did the year before,” he said. “That means that people are using Facebook, and the applications and the ecosystem, more and more.”

Call it Zuckerberg’s Law.

We think sharing is great! Except maybe not so much when you’re being pushed to do it by large corporations whose business model depends on convincing you to not value that information you’re sharing as much as advertisers do.

Yeah, for me this has always been about control, not privacy.  I’ll share what *I* want and keep private what *I* choose.  Thanks.  Facebook has just proven that we need to question what we post to any network.  Like anyone else’s bottom line is different from Zuckerdouche’s?

More Facebook “Fun” making it tempting to Stop Facebooking… (not that I was that active, anyway)

Facebook Glitch Brings New Privacy Worries

By JENNA WORTHAM
Published: May 5, 2010

On Wednesday, users discovered a glitch that gave them access to supposedly private information in the accounts of their Facebook friends, like chat conversations.

Not long before, Facebook had introduced changes that essentially forced users to choose between making information about their interests available to anyone or removing it altogether.

Although Facebook quickly moved to close the security hole on Wednesday, the breach heightened a feeling among many users that it was becoming hard to trust the service to protect their personal information.

“Facebook has become more scary than fun,” said Jeffrey P. Ament, 35, a government contractor who lives in Rockville, Md.

Mr. Ament said he was so fed up with Facebook that he deleted his account this week after three years of using the service. “Every week there seems to be a new privacy update or change, and I just can’t keep up with it.”

via NYTimes.com

This has been my attitude toward Facebook for, what feels like, years now. These latest problems, a Gizmodo rant I posted about the other day, and, quite honestly, the stories of others who share the same “can’t keep up” feelings as myself, are making me consider leaving Facebook. Or at the very least, emptying all of my content from them and no longer posting there. Thanks to Rohit Khare’s post over at TechCrunch today, I’ve learned that there are a few ways to leave Facebook.

I’m sick of this sheeple mentality from other folks who just roll with the tide and put up with anything just because something is convenient. Facebook is NOT convenient when every few months they move everything and change the ToS. Speaking of Facebook’s Terms of Service, did you know Facebook is trying to make violations of it’s ToS a crime??

I think I smell this week’s EFFYOU.